The relaunched service will have three pricing tiers that may vary depending on the market but are expected to be $10, $20, and $30, with each level receiving a particular number of credits toward movies each month.
MoviePass, the troubled subscription-based movie service, is set to resurface next month, nearly three years after it was forced to close due to financial difficulties.

According to its website, the new MoviePass will begin “on or around Labor Day,” and consumers interested in joining the service have a five-day opportunity to sign up for a waitlist that went live Thursday, Aug. 25.

“All who join the queue will receive priority access to the program as well as ten friend invites,” according to a message on MoviePass’ website. “Don’t delay since space is limited. Once the queue is closed, the only method to join will be through a friend’s invitation.”

However, the site was already experiencing technical issues Thursday morning. Those attempting to join the queue reported receiving an error message shortly after it opened at 9 a.m. ET.

MoviePass’ servers collapsed due to “overwhelming demand,” according to a tweet from the company.

The tremendous demand has caused the MoviePass website servers to breakdown, resulting in some users receiving an error message while attempting to join the queue. To accommodate demand, the supplier is trying to boost capacity. Thank you for your understanding. We will provide an update as soon as possible.

Meanwhile, it’s unclear which movie theater chains are involved, but the company’s website claims that the new service “will offer all major cinemas that take major credit cards in the United States.” A spokesman for MoviePass declined to comment on NBC News’ request for comment, referring to a Business Insider piece published Monday that stated the service had contracts with 25% of theaters nationally.

According to the MoviePass website, the service will be offered in waves based on local interest and will not be available statewide at first.

Pricing appears to be another ambiguous detail. The relaunched service will have three pricing tiers that may vary depending on the market but are expected to be $10, $20, and $30, with each level receiving a particular number of credits toward movies each month.

In 2019, MoviePass informed users that the service will be discontinued because “efforts to recapitalize MoviePass have not been effective to far.” MoviePass had been suffering for more than a year prior to its demise. As part of an eleventh-hour attempt to resurrect the subscription business, MoviePass announced a modified version of its unlimited plan in March 2018, allowing customers to view one movie per day for $9.95 per month. However, the service’s user count fell from more than 3 million to around 225,000 by April 2019.